Tag: ford model t

A Ford Model T Equipped with Chase Tracks

World War I had recently ended when this pair of photos was taken and in that conflict the British and French tank designs for traveling over all types of terrain were proven. An example of the Mark VIII Tank, an Anglo-American effort produced near the end of the conflict can be seen above in the background.

The Model “T” Ford Roadster equipped with endless tracks featured here, appears to have been demonstrated to high-ranking Army officers by a pair of business men trying to sell their design. It is wearing a 1920 New York license plate that is mounted backwards and crudely lettered U.S. Army Ord-Dept.

Tracked Model T

Another photo of the scene above exists, but just recently this excellent pair of images has been discovered. After a limited search, including patents of the time, nothing more was found to add to the story. Dan Strohl at HMN did a post on this same machine close to four years ago, but since that time we are unaware of any new information about its development.

The photo below posted by E. Bruckner on the MTFCA Forum shows that the tracks on this design were driven by four lugs clamped on on each rear wheel and tire. Larger brakes that have been mounted on the rear appear to be the means of steering the unit by slowing down or stopping one track at a time. Can any of our readers add any more details about its construction and history ?

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts


Ford Model T’s and the Springfield Arch

This was emailed to me recently, regarding the Springfield Arch in Springfield, Oregon…

The Arch in the photo was destroyed in 1927 and for the past two or three years I’ve been designing and building a scale model of a proposed new Springfield Arch, which features our town’s official symbol, The McKenzie River driftboat.  The long term game plan is to have a parade of tin lizzies pass through the new Arch as an inauguration. We’d invite any and all car clubs in the country to participate. Our community also has a yearly car rally which attracts 50’s and 60’s muscle cars, which might make a nice mix).  The completed 1:12 scale model recently went on display at Springfield City Hall. The tin lizzie I used in the display is the ONLY 1:12 scale model “Model T Ford” that I could find on the internet. Here are the images of Model-T Fords through the original Springfield Arch, in Springfield, Oregon. The photos are circa 1920. The Arch was destroyed by a flood in 1927. 

The gent keeping an eye on the model is a member of the Arch committee and editor/publisher of a newspaper, McKenzie River Reflections, serving the McKenzie River valley.

The original Springfield Arch…

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts


The Story of my Ford Model T

This video tells the story of how I came to own a Ford Model T…

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/modeltford/

The Story of my Ford Model T

My car is a 1925 Ford Model T Open Tourer, built at Henry Ford’s Highland Park Plant, in Detroit, Michigan, USA. It never strayed far from the factory, its previous home, Ann Arbor, Michigan, just 60km away. From new, it’s had just three owners, myself being the third.

I’ve had a passion for vintage and veteran cars ever since I was a little tacker, and I always had a dream that, some day, I might have one of my own.

It all started in 1994, at age 7, while living in Albany, WA, where the former Extravaganza motor museum; once home to one of the most famous veteran cars in history, a 1904 Darracq called “Genevieve” famous for its appearance in the 1953 movie Genevieve. From that point, I was hooked on old cars, and as a boy, built countless models from Lego.

Later in 2009, I was living in Burnie, Tasmania, and even though the “Wonders of Wynyard” motor museum was only a few kilometres away, ironically, I never went there! The museum is home to the equal oldest Ford vehicle in the world – a 1903 Ford Model A.

So I wanted to own a vintage car, and I thought what better car to own than one of the most significant cars in history; the Ford Model T. It was the world’s first car to be mass produced on an assembly line. The Model T has the second highest production number of any car in history, with just over 15 million of them built in its 19 year production run, between 1908 and 1927. It’s only been surpassed by the Volkswagen Beetle, with 21 million produced.

My family and I moved to NSW in 2010. In January of 2011, I decided I wanted to buy a Model T. I scoured the Internet, hoping I might be able to buy one in Australia, but none were within my budget, the lowest priced car I found, was $45,000 – that was never going to happen! So I resorted to looking in America, and finally found the car, that would ultimately become my own.

I imported the car, with the help of my father. He imports all kinds of products from overseas, so I have to thank him for his assistance in importing my car. It took 8 months, almost $6,000 in freight charges and import fees, and much anticipation, from when I expressed an interest in the car, to when it actually arrived on Australian soil.

Almost every part on the car is original, with the exception of the seat upholstery, and of course, the tyres. Even the 89 year-old, 20 horsepower engine is original and still running as smoothly as ever.

The car underwent a partial restoration in 1966, and was garaged ever since. I had the roof restored in Taree by a very skilled upholsterer, Graham from Taree Upholsterers. A local tyre fitter, whom to my surprise had antique equipment in the workshop, was able to replace the perished inner-tube on the spare wheel. I’ve replaced the 4 coil boxes, so now the engine runs as it should.

There’s obviously no formal training available these days to teach anyone how to drive such a historic museum piece, so I learned via videos on YouTube, uploaded by fellow Model T enthusiasts.

The controls of the Model T are nothing like a modern car. There are three pedals on the floor – none of which are the accelerator! There’s the clutch, the reverse pedal, and the brake. The handbrake lever not only operates the parking brake, it doubles up as the gear lever – which is very amusing to modern mechanics when you try and explain it to them! The Model T has just 2 forward gears, plus reverse; and has a top speed of about 70km/h (45mph). I’ve been clocked at 60km/h, but mostly only drive around 40-50km/h.

By the time the car arrived, I felt confident I would be able to drive her, after I got the car started for the first time, my Tin Lizzie performed almost perfectly, although the fuel was running extremely rich at first, which caused her to blow lots of smoke! With some assistance from a fellow Model T owner and friend from Sydney, I soon had the engine running to original spec.

Since the car arrived in August last year, I’ve had to do little maintenance. The Model T was heralded as one of the most reliable cars in history. However, for safety reasons, I’ve added a set of auxiliary brakes. The reason for this, the original brakes are not attached to the wheels, as with a modern car – they are attached to the transmission, and have cotton linings. While I had every faith in the T’s ability to stop, it wouldn’t hurt to have an extra insurance policy!

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts



Ford Model T with new Champion X spark plugs…

My new Champion X spark plugs are now installed in my 1925 Ford Model T – what a boost in performance! Beats the heck out of my old Champion 25’s….

Thankyou very much to Mark Carley for recommending the Champion X’s to me – Investment well made I say  —

Took the T out for a spin this morning with the new plugs in, and she now pulls much better up hills, and goes a little faster too…

 

Champion X Spark Plugs, Ford Model T

Champion X Spark Plugs, Ford Model T

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts





Thomas Edison’s 1916 Ford Model T

Did you know Thomas Edison owned a Model T? 

In March 1916, “with Mr. Ford’s compliments,” local Ford agent Hill & Company presented a Model T touring car to Thomas Edison, long time personal friend of Henry Ford. The value of the vehicle was $482.75.

In 1922, Ford and Edison traveled to downtown Fort Myers in the car, stopping, at Hill & Company to talk with Hill and shake hands with his employees. Edison  referred to such jaunts as “motor rides.”

This “Southern Trade” Model T has a 60-inch wide tread, rather than the standard 56-inch tread. The wider tread was designed so the cars’ wheels would fit into existing wagon ruts on the rough roads that often existed in small southern towns like Fort Myers. Edison’s friend Harvey Firestone updated the original wooden wheels with balloon tires in 1924.

Thomas Edison’s 1916 Ford Model T

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts



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