Tag: model t ford

Vintage Engines and Tractors at Toowoomba Ag Show

As well as having an interest in the Ford Model T, I also like old engines and tractors — in this video, I was at the Heritage Bank Ag Show in Toowoomba, QLD, where I encountered a collection of stationary hit and miss engines, a miniature ride-on gasoline powered traction engine, and a collection of vintage tractors.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net



Ford Model T – Troubleshooting – Fault finding when your Lizzie is having a bad day!

The following list basically outlines some troubles you may experience at some point, and where to look for them…

ENGINE FAILS TO START

1. Gas mixture too lean.
2. Water in gasoline.
3. Vibrators adjusted too close.
4. Water or congealed oil in commutator.
5. Magneto contact point (in trans. cover) obstructed with foreign matter.
6. Gasoline supply shut off.
7. Carburetor frozen (in zero weather).
8. Water frozen in gasoline tank sediment bulb.
9. Coil switch off.

ENGINE LACKS POWER—RUNS IRREGULARLY 

At Low Speeds

1. Poor compression—account leaky valves.
2. Gas mixture too rich or too lean.
3. Spark plugs dirty.
4. Coil vibrator improperly adjusted.
5. Air leak in intake manifold.
6. Weak exhaust, valve spring.
7. Too great clearance between valve stem and push rod.
8. Too close gap between spark plug points.

At High Speeds.

1. Commutator contact imperfect.
2. Weak valve spring.
3. Too much gap in spark plug.
4. Imperfect gas mixture.
5. Platinum points dirty or burned.

ENGINE STOPS SUDDENLY

1. Gasoline tank empty.
2. Water in gasoline.
3. Flooded carburetor.

ENGINE OVERHEATS

1. Lack of water.
2. Lack of oil.
3. Fan belt torn, loose or slipping.
4. Carbon deposit in combustion chamber.
5. Spark retarded too far.
6. Gas mixture too rich.
7. Water circulation retarded by sediment in radiator.
8. Dirty spark plugs.

ENGINE KNOCKS

1. Carbon deposit on piston heads.
2. Loose connecting rod bearing.
3. Loose crank shaft bearing.
4. Spark advanced too far.
5. Engine overheated.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


How the Ford Model T Came to be…

The Ford Motor Company manufactured its first car – the Model A – in 1903. By 1906, the Model N was in production but Ford had not yet achieved his goal of producing a simple, affordable car. He would accomplish this with the Model T. Charles Sorensen – who had joined Henry Ford two years earlier – describes how Ford had him set up a secret room where design of the new car would be carried out:

“Early one morning in the winter of 1906-7, Henry Ford dropped in at the pattern department of the Piquette Avenue plant to see me. ‘Come with me, Charlie,’ he said, ‘I want to show you something.’

I followed him to the third floor and its north end, which was not fully occupied for assembly work. He looked about and said, ‘Charlie, I’d like to have a room finished off right here in this space. Put up a wall with a door in big enough to run a car in and out. Get a good lock for the door, and when you’re ready, we’ll have Joe Galamb come up in here. We’re going to start a completely new job.’

The room he had in mind became the maternity ward for Model T.

It took only a few days to block off the little room on the third floor back of the Piquette Avenue plant and to set up a few simple power tools and Joe Galamb’s two blackboards. The blackboards were a good idea. They gave a king-sized drawing which, when all initial refinements had been made, could be photographed for two purposes: as a protection against patent suits attempting to prove prior claim to originality and as a substitute for blueprints. A little more than a year later Model T, the product of that cluttered little room, was announced to the world. But another half year passed before the first Model T was ready for what had already become a clamorous market…

The summer before, Mr. Ford told me to block off the experimental room for Joe Galamb, a momentous event occurred which would affect the entire automotive industry. The first heat of vanadium steel in the country was poured at the United Steel Company’s plant in Canton, Ohio.

Early that year we had several visits from J. Kent Smith, a noted English metallurgist from a country which had been in the forefront of steel development…

Ford, Wills, and I listened to him and examined his data. We had already read about this English vanadium steel. It had a tensile strength nearly three times that of steels we were using, but we’d never seen it. Smith demonstrated its toughness and showed that despite its strength it could be machined more easily than plain steel. Immediately Mr. Ford sensed the great possibilities of this shock-resisting steel. ‘Charlie,’ he said to me after Smith left, ‘this means entirely new design requirements, and we can get a better, lighter, and cheaper car as a result of it.’

It was the great common sense that Mr. Ford could apply to new ideas and his ability to simplify seemingly complicated problems that made him the pioneer he was. This demonstration of vanadium steel was the deciding point for him to begin the experimental work that resulted in Model T

Actually it took four years and more to develop Model T. Previous models were the guinea pigs, one might say, for experimentation and development of a car which would realize Henry Ford’s dream of a car which anyone could afford to buy, which anyone could drive anywhere, and which almost anyone could keep in repair. Many of the world’s greatest mechanical discoveries were accidents in the course of other experimentation. Not so Model T, which ushered in the motor transport age and set off a chain reaction of machine production now known as automation. All our experimentation at Ford in the early days was toward a fixed and, then wildly fantastic goal.

By March, 1908, we were ready to announce Model T, but not to produce it, On October 1 of that year the first car was introduced to the public. From Joe Galamb’s little room on the third floor had come a revolutionary vehicle. In the next eighteen years, out of Piquette Avenue, Highland Park, River Rouge, and from assembly plants all over the United States came 15,000,000 more.”

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


Great Eastland Hub Rally — Double Show n Shine!

Great Eastland Hub Rally — Double Show n Shine — Hosted by Taree Historic Motor Club

Show n Shine Events:

Day 1: Old Bar Beach Festival – Sports Grounds adjacent to Historic Airstrip, Old Bar Rd, Old Bar, NSW

– Saturday, 5th October, 2013 – 10:00am – 3:00pm

Day 2: Hub Rally Show n Shine – Taree Leagues Club – 43 Cowper St, Taree NSW

– Sunday, 6th October, 2013 – From 9:00am

 


Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


Why was the Ford Model T so historically important?

Here are some good reasons why the Ford Model T was a great car for its time:

Price: The Model T was not the first car to be the most affordable, but it was priced in the same ballpark as its closest contemporary, the horse. By continually driving down the price of his cars, using optimization techniques like the application of the assembly line in 1913, Ford made more cars than anyone else in his day. When he instituted the 5 dollar a day wage for his workers he was not only an instant folk hero but he gave every worker the financial means to buy his cars.

Reliability: Easier to get out of the barn and get going than hooking up the team to the wagon, and the planetary transmission with a flywheel magneto and Ford’s use of vanadium steel for strength made the car reliable and easy to operate. When it did need repair, the revolutionary separate head and block design pioneered by Ford and the simplicity of the overall design made maintenance simpler, faster and ultimately more affordable. A few simple tools can keep a Ford Model T running for years.

Perpetual Integration: The Ford Model T was easy to modify and whole industries of after market modifications were introduced to transform them into race cars, utility vehicles, sawmills and even snowmobiles. Modifications to Model T cars are still commonplace today, making it an icon of the last century and of the modern era.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


How to Drive a Ford Model T in Plain English (Summary)

Ford made the Model T easy to drive compared to today’s cars since the people he sold his cars to did not know how to drive anything other than a horse. It is not like driving a modern car, even though there are three pedals on the floor like a modern manual transmission car. A Model T has a steering wheel that works the same way as in cars of today, but almost everything else is different.

The first Model T’s did not even have a starter like a modern car. This is the powerful electric motor in a car that turns the engine to make it run when it is turned off. The engine on the Model T was started with a hand crank on the front of the car. A wire loop near the radiator worked the choke on the carburetor to give the engine extra fuel to help start it when it was cold. This could be dangerous if a person was not careful. If the levers that controlled the engine were not set the right way, especially the spark control, the engine could backfire, or spin the wrong way. Many people got broken arms this way.

Doctors even had a special name for this kind of break: the “Ford Fracture.” Many Model T owners added electric starters to their cars and it was not long before Ford started doing the same. A Model T is in high gear by default, so if the Parking/Clutch lever was not engaged, the car had a tendency to run over the operator when started.

To make a modern car go or accelerate once the engine is running, a person steps on a pedal on the floor to engage the transmission into low gear. To make a Model T accelerate, move two levers near the steering wheel. The lever on the right was the throttle (or engine speed), and the lever on the left adjusted the time that the spark plugs fired. These levers needed to be set properly before the engine could be started.

The three pedals on the floor of the Model T were for the brake on the right, reverse in the middle to make the Model T go backwards, and a pedal on the left to shift the gears from low to high speed. A lever on the floor worked the brakes as well as the clutch. Pulling the lever toward the driver would set the parking brake and help keep the car from moving while parked. When the lever was placed in the middle, the transmission would be in neutral.

Once the engine is running, the driver now has to make the Model T move on its own. Step on the pedal all the way to the left, move the throttle lever to “give it the gas” and gently move the floor lever forward. This is low gear, the powerful gear used to get the Model T moving. Once it’s moving, move the right lever up, let the left pedal come all the way up, and give it more gas to shift into high. To make the car go faster still, move the throttle lever as well as the spark advance lever. Stepping on the left pedal only halfway puts the car in neutral, the same as the lever. This helps the Model T come to a stop without causing the engine to stop as well.

The brakes on a Model T work the rear wheels by the use of brake bands inside the transmission. Modern cars have brakes on all four wheels. No brakes are on the front of a Model T.
More than fifteen million (15,000,000) Model T cars were built. It was not until 1971 that the record was broken by the Volkswagen. Today, the record for the most cars built is held by the Toyota Corolla.
The Model T was nicknamed the “Tin Lizzie” and “Flivver” by the people who drove it. A new car took the place of the Model T in 1928, the Ford Model A.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net



How to Drive a Ford Model T (Part 10)

Transmission

The Ford Model T planetary transmission has three bands, one for low gear, one for reverse and one for the brake. These bands need to be changed from time to time, but if you can wear them all out together you will get the longest time between band changes.

The brake band has the hardest life while the reverse band gets relatively little use. The wear can be equalized by using reverse pedal for some of the braking. Use reverse first to slow the car, then slide the foot across onto the brake pedal to come to a halt.

These bands and gearing run in the engine crankcase oil. If they are allowed to slip too much the oil is burned off and the lining of the band will be worn very quickly. To avoid this always hold the low gear pedal down firmly and do your braking in relatively short bursts releasing the pressure to allow the oil back round the lining.

The transmission is an Epicyclic or Planetary gear transmission. Using 3 triple gears rotating around a driven gear, like the planets orbiting the sun.

Because the different gear teeth are always in mesh, it is not possible to “crash” or “grind” the gears as can be done in a more traditional style gearbox.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


How to Drive a Ford Model T (Part 9)

A Three Point Turn

Once the finer points of maneuvering have been mastered, the Model T three point turn-around much loved by the likes of Laurel and Hardy can be tried.

This consists of getting an instant reverse by pressing the reverse pedal when going forward and then doing the same thing with the low gear pedal when going back to give a second instant change of direction. This should be done with some care so as not to strain the transmission.

Other drivers are mystified as to how this is done without any grappling of gear levers.

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net


All content Copyright © 2014 Mitchell Taylor (FordModelT.net). All rights reserved.
Ford Model T