Tag: radiator

Model T World Tour is Back on the Road! :)

In the Summer of 2012 Dirk and Trudy Regter from the Netherlands started a journey in their 1915 Ford Model T, visiting over 50 countries covering all the continents of the world. 

This journey of approx. 80,000 miles will be made in order to raise money to support the worldwide work of SOS Children’s villages International.

You can follow their adventure and make a donation to the cause at their website:

http://www.tfordworldtour.org 

YouTube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYRFILbKdXwadV0Xasymsbg 

 

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts



I bought my new radiator from The Brassworks, and I have to say, I’m very impressed.

Here’s the instructions that came with it for best results…

Do not leave your radiator in the box; install it, flush fluids through the radiator and polish brass as needed.

Radiators are constructed with solder and flux, a mildly corrosive acid. Each radiator is pressure tested in a test tank to assure there are no leaks and neutralize any flux used in the assembly. Leaving a radiator in a sealed box for a prolonged time may cause residual flux to oxidize. This oxidation may cause the polished brass to turn a light orange color and in extreme cases may “etch” the metal. This can be avoided by circulating fluids in the radiator and in the case of polished brass radiators, polishing the metal.

We recommend the use of distilled water to prevent premature mineral build-up in engines and radiators. Our customers often use a combination of 50/50 distilled water and ethyl glycol and report success. We are unaware of any long-term consequence to this common coolant.

The Brassworks

Brassworks radiator

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts


Getting my Leaky Model T Radiator Repaired, Part 2

On November 16th, I decided it was about time I had my radiator out; and have an apparent leak repaired.

It had me fooled from the very start, I observed a considerable rusty water stain on the back of the radiator core, to the right-hand side, and some water had accumulated nearby. However, the core itself turned out to be just fine!

After taking my radiator to Taree Radiators for repair, it turns out, the overflow pipe (which runs down the back of the radiator core) had a hidden hole, which was leaking rusty water onto the radiator core, which then tracked across to the opposite side of the radiator, and it really looked like the core itself was leaking! The bad section of pipe was cut out, and replaced with rubber overflow hose, it’s hard to tell the difference, it’s all black!

Thankfully, the copper core itself is in perfect condition. The brass tanks top and bottom were also in perfect condition, except for a small crack which had appeared on the top of the top tank, so I had that soldered.

I gave all the cast portions of the radiator a good coat of bitumen paint inside and out, the can says it’s good for rusty surfaces and protects against further corrosion, so it should help with longevity.

I’m going to be trialling a glycol-free corrosion inhibitor in my radiator, one which does not affect the water boiling point, which would upset the Model T’s thermosiphon cooling and cause overheating – not a good idea!

Model T looking rather naked with no radiator!

Dubious looking rust stain was a cruel deception!

Freshly painted radiator, with no leaks!

Mitch Taylor

New South Wales, Australia

www.FordModelT.net

FordModelT.net - For Model T Owners & Enthusiasts



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